MAGIA DEL MOMENTO: Antonio Marra

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present MAGIA DEL MOMENTO, Antonio Marra’s premiere solo show at the gallery, on view from September 7th to October 14th, 2017.

Antonio Marra’s 3D paintings are simultaneously familiar and revolutionary. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly coloured geometric works, Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of the unexpected.

Antonio Marra, Das Geheimniss der letzten Rille (left view, front view, and right view), 2016

59 x 59 x 1 inches

Using precise mathematical calculations, Marra introduces sculptural features that elevate his paintings. His masterful craftsmanship is evident in the thick, precisely painted grooves formed entirely by the artist’s own hand. Walking alongside the work allows the dynamic energy of the optical illusion to manifest. The observer has to move from one side of the painting to the other, otherwise they’re only seeing a fraction of Marra’s artistry.

The exhibition is a kaleidoscopic experience; Marra affects the audience’s perception of depth by manipulating colour, shape, and form. His works are provocative as they present a challenge, awakening curiosity and inspiring interaction. His lenticulars demonstrate conflict, briefly offering a moment of rigidity and certainty through distinct geometric patterns that are then disrupted, undergoing a metamorphosis that can only be initiated by the spectator.

Antonio Marra was born in Italy and has lived in Germany for many years. He has exhibited in Germany and throughout Europe since the early 1990s. Recently, his work has been shown in the United States. Marra’s works are on view in public collections including the Museum Explora Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany and the Ritter Museum Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany.

Advertisements

FRESH! 3rd Annual Summer Show “GEOFORM”

New York, NY. JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present FRESH! 3rd Annual Summer Show: GEOFORM, a group show in collaboration with Arte Ponte Cultural Institute, featuring works by 26 artists demonstrating their interpretations of geometric abstraction.

GEOFORM is a mixed-media show where visitors are invited to participate in uniquely constructed realities composed by a diverse group of international emerging artists. The exhibition highlights the potential of geometric forms; it is through the combination of pure shape and structure that reality is decoded and the audience is introduced to an intensely raw experience.

Exhibited artists include

Guang Zhu | Brooklyn, NY Patti Samper | Montclair, NJ Stacy Lovejoy | Portland, OR Larry Jones | Terre Haute, IN Ryota Matsumoto | Tokyo, Japan Danielle Feldhaker | Tel Aviv, Israel Sabre Esler | Atlanta, GA John Wilson | Manteo, NC Sean Mick | Jamaica Plain, MA Atsuko Okamoto | Boynton Beach, FL Jackie Tufford | Jupiter, FL George Goodridge | Miami Beach, FL Myoung Su (Sienna) Ko | Providence, RI Blair Martin Cahill | Ojai, CA Jon Merritt | Newburyport, MA April Hammock | Baton Rouge, LA Lisa Fromartz | New York, NY  Kyle Yip | Toronto, ON Monica Delgado | New York, NY Amy Chan | Henrico, VA Jane Lincoln | East Falmouth, MA Blaine Breaux | River Ridge, LA Russell Bellamy | Leesburg, FL Roberta Estes | Seneca Falls, NY Sharmen Liao | Los Angeles, CA Clark Rendall | Brooklyn, NY

Through the works of Danielle Feldhaker and April Hammock, visitors are introduced to the foundations of the genre; both artists reference the styles of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and other abstractionists, while bringing something uniquely theirs as demonstrated by individual varying combinations of form and colour.

Guang Zhu celebrates the beauty of non-objective form by taking a mathematical approach to his work. There is a sense of satisfaction from her organized process, a characteristic also shared by Patti Samper, who captures orderly delight through the simplicity and minimalism of her shapes. Similarly, Sabre Esler’s works are methodically calculated; her patterns are developed logically while also managing to establish a human connection.

There is an added complexity to the works of Larry Jones, Stacy Lovejoy, and Jackie Tufford, as their compositions are emotionally charged. From Jones’s tightly coiled sculptures, to the regal nostalgia of Tufford’s stained glass, to the celebration of childhood in Lovejoy’s works, each artist coerces a different, and yet equally powerful visceral response.

Although chaotic in nature, the works of Ryota Matsumoto, Blaine Breaux, Kyle Yip, and Sharmen Liao, are likewise commanding. The shapes in their works permeate the space, establishing relationships that are simultaneously tumultuous and harmonious. This dichotomy is further illustrated by Atsuko Okamoto and Myoung Su (Sienna) Ko, who find peace by injecting tension. They guide viewers through a balancing act of contrasting elements; from cool and warm tones to the dual experience of movement and stability.

Viewers are exposed to a delicate vulnerability in the works of Blair Martin Cahill, Lisa Fromartz, Monica Delgado, and Russell Bellamy. Each artist redefines perception and creates depth and meaning through layers. Meaning is derived from the relationship between each layer, and audiences are moved towards self-reflection as they consider the juxtaposition of seemingly contradictory elements.

That correspondence between visitor and artwork is further accentuated by George Goodridge, Jon Merritt, Amy Chan  and Jane Lincoln. The audience is present as they participate in an organic dialogue between space and work. The dimensionality of their works reach out and communicates with viewers, pressing for interaction and seeking to be given meaning.

Much like Rosecrans, John Wilson’s work holds architectural elements. Influenced by his background in architecture, Wilson’s art provides structure and shape without instruction; simply permitting the non-objective to exist.

The works of Sean Mick and Roberta Estes exhibit the spirit of geometric abstraction as expressed by Mick, who describes his work as ‘reductive visual language.’ Clark Rendall, whose works are inspired by bodies of water, also embodies this essence of deconstructing, allowing the audience freedom over meaning.

It is through the mastering the genre of geometric abstraction, that these artists create a pure concept that challenges perception and redefines reality.

The exhibition opens on Thursday, July 13th, 2017, and will remain on view through August 18th, 2017.

 

Novum Spatium: Dieter Balzer and Dirk Salz

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Novum Spatium, a two-person show featuring German based artists Dirk Salz and Dieter Balzer, on view from March 16th to May 6th, 2017.

Novum Spatium, meaning New Space, explores the concept of perception in relation to our environment, physical space and one’s interaction within it.

Dieter Balzer, translates these ideas through pristine geometric abstraction, creating sculptural, minimalist form that deal with depth and negative space. Bright, intricate and overlapping; the complex elements built upon each other, carry the viewer’s eyes over and through an endless, looping playground of planes.

papilio_wg2_1_copy

Elements of Balzer’s work run parallel to contemporary influences on graphic, industrial, and architectural design. The flatness of the vibrantly colored foils create a contemporary twist on the theories of non-representational neoplasticism, cubist sculpture and the Japanese Superflat movement.

Where Balzer uses 3-dimensional elements, the work of Dirk Salz approaches these concepts from another perspective. Instead of creating physical depth with his work, Salz toys with the impression of it. Salz’s uses simple, Supremacist compositions that seem to echo with their color transparency and smooth surfaces.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 12.36.24 PM.png

These highly reflective pieces confront the viewer with their own image, and present an experience of shifting planes, and varying depths. Surrounding elements found within the work’s environment emerge and are mirrored as one moves back and forth between the self and the work.

Like John McLaughlin’s Light and Space movement, the works invoke a sense of temporality within one’s perception like a Robert Irwin or James Turrel installation; reinventing the world around us.

Together, the two artists create a visual dialogue that is crisp, energetic and articulate. Moving between the two bodies of work invokes a sense of moving between worlds, one that brightly invokes the geometric quality of architecture and the digital world that is so familiar to us, while the other allows us to reflect on the quality of space and our place within it.

Dieter Balzer studied at the Universities of Heidelberg and Chesterfield College of Art. His work can be viewed across Germany at the Stern-Wywiol Galerie in Hamburg and the Galerie Corona Unger in Bremen, Germany; and has previously shown across the United States and Canada. He currently lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Dirk Salz studied at RWTH in Aachen, Germany and lives and works in Mulheim an der Ruhr. Exhibitions include public institutions such as the Museum Katharinenhof, Kranenburg, Kunstmuseum Mülheim/Ruhr, Germany and has shown with various international galleries and art fairs.

Building Mountains: First Solo Show of Minjung Kim

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Building Mountains, Minjung Kim’s first Solo Show in New York, opening on 2 February, 2017 and on view through 11 March, 2017.

The work of Kim demonstrates her foundation in the traditional Korean calligraphic arts as well as the influence of mid-20th Century abstract expressionism, both of which celebrate the ability to convey energy and spirit through the manipulation of line and practiced spontaneity. Her artworks make use of small torn pieces of HaKimMinjung-Building Forest15_19, 165x130cm,2015.JPGnji, a traditional handmade paper from Korea, as well as ink and paint in a sculptural capacity creating the illusion of dimensionality, geometric form, and architectural minimalism.

Her work explores the expressive potential of pure material. The tone of her work is often at once contemplative and whimsical, ethereal and scientific. It moves onlookers to consider man’s place in nature and our relationships to each other.

She is hesitant to label her work as art — rather she describes her practice as a “discipline of life,” a meditative process which simultaneously requires her to focus her energy and to clear her mind.

Kim obtained her MFA and PhD at Seoul National University. She has been widely exhibited with exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as Danwon Museum of Art, Shangshang Museum of Art, Seoul Art Center, Bunan Museum of Art, Namsong Museum of Art, and Hanwan Museum of Art. She has won countless awards and honors including the 2004 Dong-A Art Prize, 20th Kyungin Great Art Prize, and the 7th Nahyseuk Women Art Prize. She currently lives and works in Korea.

Behind The Glass First Solo Show of Michael Burges

02no-13-2015_180x150

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Behind The Glass, Michael Burges’ premier Solo Show in New York, opening on 20 October, 2016 and on view through 28 January, 2017. This exhibit showcases Burges’ most recent works from his Reverse Glass Paintings series, which he has been working on since 2009. Employing a unique technique of reverse glass painting with gold and platinum leaf, Burges creates large works with an extraordinary color presence, aesthetic precision and visual impact.

In his most recent series Reverse Glass Paintings, Burges uses plexiglass instead of canvas to create a “window” to an alternative reality, and bends the rules of traditional painting techniques. Using a multi-layering process, Burges freely plays with combinations of colors, experimenting with various methods of applying paint with rags and sponges; for his backgrounds the artists uses precious metals including platinum, copper and gold leaf.

What the viewer sees is an abstract painting, free of pre-conceptions – the viewer is invited to freely interpret the art – Burges hence invites us to an open, non-verbal dialogue.

Burges has been exploring the possibilities of color, space, their relationship as well as the effect it produces on the viewer and vice versa since 1983. His approach to painting is often described as a ‘science of art’, comparable to the visual expression of scientific laws and hypothesis. There is however a spiritual quality to his work, embodying elements of Buddhism principles, suggesting the influence of the artist’s background in Comparative Religions, Ethnology and Indiology.

Michael Burges was born in Duesseldorf, Germany in 1954. He currently lives and works in Dusseldorf and Italy. He attended Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf, where he studies social sciences. Shortly thereafter he studied Comparative Religions, Ethnology and Indology at Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Bonn, Germany. Burges began painting in 1981 and is influenced by American Painter Douglas Swan. In 1983 he became engrossed in the style of abstract painting that has persisted as his method of expression through to the present. JanKossen Contemporary has chosen to showcase his work as it reflects strongly upon the aesthetic and conceptual intentions of the gallery.

He has had installations spanning internationally, including exhibitions in Paris, Belgium, Munich, Los Angeles, and Miami.

Suh Jeong Min: Solo show

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present The Word of Prayer, the gallery’s third solo exhibition featuring works by Korean artist Suh Jeong Min.

Suh’s work presents a rich and traditional subject matter with sleek geometric designs and flowing rhythmic patterns. His process begins by collecting handmade Hanji paper from Buddhist temples and traditional calligraphists’ studios; the latter a source of discarded works and sketches, and the former a home of prayers that were written and deposited. After collecting the paper, Suh glues and rolls the Hanji and carefully mounts hundreds of rolls on a handmade wooden board and frame.

By bearing evidence to the ink applied by past owners, the paper exists in two worlds; they pay homage to their previous life as prayers and calligraphy–orienting viewers to Suh’s cultural background, while simultaneously telling the stories that Suh positions them to tell.

Suh Jeong Min’s subject matter ranges from spirituality to depictions of Korean architecture and ephemeral sensations. In all that they depict, the content of the work is rooted in a cultural and religious framework which reflects the contemporary thinker’s reverence for the past.

This will be Suh’s first solo show in the USA. The artist lives and works in Seoul, Korea.

FRESH 2016: Update

 

JanKossen Contemporary’s annual summer show FRESH! has now reached its’ 4 week mark since its opening, and experts and the public have given us ample feedback about the works exhibited. Our opening vernissage which took place on July 7th was a huge success with over 150 people coming through. The crowd included the artists’ friends and family, passerby, and select invited guests who were either speculating, congratulating, or simply just browsing the fresh talents present in the show.

We have invited a group of professionals from within the art world such as gallerists and curators to visit the exhibition and provide feedback and criticism for these emerging talents. Among them was Jessica Porter from Porter Contemporary located in both Chelsea and Flatiron. She showed interest in Jason Bryant, Neven Zoricic, and Zachary Williams’ portraits. Previously a JanKossen staff member, junior curator Sherri Littlefield who now works extensively with pop up galleries around the New York City area; was engrossed in Colleen Fitzgerald, Aniko Safran, and Roman Traexler’s eye-catching pieces. Journalist and writer and account manager, Neha Jambhekar from Artnet News was drawn to Axelle Kieffer, Clay Jordan, and Nina Sumarac’s to be her top picks. We also asked our friendly neighbors to join in with their insights. Chelsea Ramirez, gallery assistant at Denise Bibro Gallery was impressed by the works of Christopher Owen Nelson, Byungkwan Kim, and Melonie Mulkey. Lastly, for an alternative and fresh viewpoint, we welcomed art and design expert, architect Jee Won Kim for his top three picks, resulting in the selection for Maxwell Emcays, Jack Rosenberg, and Jasmin Edelbrunner’s pieces.

In a more intimate yet casual light, there was an overwhelming praise for Clay Jordan and Melonie Mulkey’s pieces from the staff and visitors to the gallery. JanKossen’s sales associates Adel Wong, as well as current and previous interns Dohie Kim, Cooper Lovano, and Jordan Choptovy were fascinated by the intricate abstraction of the figure in Mulkey’s photograph as well as the tasteful simplicity of Jordan’s work. JanKossen Gallery Director Jasmin Kossenjans was also particularly impressed by Axelle Kieffer, Neven Zoricic, and Jasmin Edelbrunner’s works.

Overall, it is safe to say that Melonie Mulkey’s work has gotten an astounding amount of acclamation from both our experts as well as the general public, along with Clay Jordan’s and Jasmin Edelbrunner’s pieces.

FRESH! runs through August 17th before JanKossen closes for the rest of the month.

FRESH! Opening Vernissage

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

63-07072016

From left to right: Christopher Parrott, Marc Dessauvage, Colleen Fitzgerald, Evan Schwartz, Jason Bryant, Anikó Sáfrán, and Jack Rosenberg

We had a wonderful opening reception last Thursday, a huge thanks to everyone who came out to join us!

Artists above were present during the opening, as well as Maxwell Emcays and Mark Liam Smith who did not make it into the group photo.

The show was a great success especially with the presence of the artists and their friends and family. I think it is safe to say that this was a well-received show, and everybody had a great time chatting and getting to know their fellow artists, or simply just looking at all the remarkable works.

FRESH! runs until August 17th, so drop by and have a look!

Save

Save

Psychedelic

Experimenting with intensified and distorted sensory perception, BynumSimmons, and Laube transform traditional art forms into psychedelic encounters.

Peter Bynum invites viewers to experience a higher form of consciousness, to engage in meditation on the oneness of all living things, and abandon artistic ego to the innate intelligence of paint. Exploiting the inherent branching composition and dendritic forms of pressurized paint, the artist reveals the medium’s affinity to infrastructures present in nature. Corporeal capillaries and floral root systems are recalled with kaleidoscopic intensity in Bynum’s illuminated paintings. Abandoning the restriction of direct light, the artist utilizes the pure white light of flat-panel LEDs to illuminate acrylic through panes of tempered glass. Darkroom exhibition enhances the psychotropic experience of Bynum’s light-infused works.

Opposition dominates the work of Troy Simmons. Inspired by the dissonant relationship between man and nature, the artist explores possibilities for a stable coexistence of opposites. Recalling the emergence of vegetal growth from sidewalk crevices, Simmons’ sculptures juxtapose somber concrete and aluminum against vibrant splashes of acrylic paint. Echoing the artist’s fascination with nature and modern Brutalist Architecture, medium identifies Simmons’ works as contemporary manifestations of the 1960s Arte Povera movement, transforming foundational building materials into vessels of aesthetic creation. Dichotomous concept and medium serve as a physical investigation of what Simmons refers to as ‘incompatible binary relationships’. Deliberate and overt, such opposition knocks viewers off balance, resulting in a psychedelic experience of Simmons’ work.

Transgressing boundaries of traditional painting, Michael Laube unshackles the medium from the confines of space and time. Suspension of acrylic paint within sheets of plexiglass produce fluctuating highlights, reflections, and refractions incapable of absolute localization. The result: disembodied, dematerialized surfaces transformed by light. Inextricably woven into the surrounding space, Laube’s sculptural paintings exist beyond conformity to the definition of pure objectivity, capturing a spatial color effect reminiscent of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. Appearing to mutate and diversify, the hallucinogenic quality of Laube’s work encourages viewers to change perspective and experience the work from varying angles.